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The struggles with having an autistic child

November 23, 2018

I recently came across this wonderful article (you can read it here)

that pricked my memory.  On a few sessions I have had with children, who had a form of autism. 

 

Before the sessions, I remember the parents being really concerned with how their child was going to behave. Actually getting themselves worked up. Even though I assured them, 

 

  • There was no time limit on the session. So no matter how long it took to be able to get the best portraits, it didn't matter.

  • I will NEVER ask a child to pose or constrict them in any way that would make them feel uncomfortable or restricted.

All I want them to do is play and do their own thing. Whether the child has autism or not. 

 

Were just going to have a fun walk in the park. Or a session in their home environment.

 

So no matter how long it took to be able to get the best portraits... it didn't matter. B, I will NEVER ask a child to pose or constrict them in any way they feel awkward or restricted. 

 

As all I want them to do is play and do their own thing. Whether the child has autism or not. C, Were just going to have a fun walk in the park! :) 

 

This got me thinking. I wonder how many parents out there don't have their family photographed because of the anxiety they thought this experience could bring?

 

Yet they really would love a professional family photograph? 

 

After the session with the children, I mentioned earlier. Their mothers were delighted and somewhat relieved with how the session turned out. I even managed to get a hug on a few occasions. Something one mother was truly amazed at. Which choked me up.

 

I felt honoured that I had bonded with a child, who could usually be difficult bonding with anyone. Yet they thought I'd earned a hug. Amazing! 

 

Are you or do you know anyone with issues similar to this? I'm not talking about just being photographed. I mean in general. Do they panic about going to everyday things? Are you a parent that would love a professional family portrait but just put it off and off through sheer dread. Of what could or maybe or maybe not happen? 

 

I do think that a lot of parents do associate professional photography just being restricted to a studio. Which probably would spark up some feeling of constriction with a child who didn't like to be out of routine. Or kept within a space they don't like.

 

In all fairness, I do believe any child are not themselves in this sort of environment. However, I am very aware of how much this can affect in more of a bad way,  certain children with a form of autism a lot more. 

 

If this sounds like you or someone you know who has shared concerns that they would like a session but couldn't. Give me a call or email. 

 

Here is a review from one of the lovely mothers who had concerns about her child.

 

 

"I'd been wanting some professional photos taken of my little boy for a while, but was hesitant to book with anyone as he's not the easiest to get a photo of and is quite shy. I finally booked a shoot with Jane and I'm so happy I did. I would highly recommend her to anyone looking for a photographer. I was quite worried that Kyron wouldn't play ball but I needn't of been, she has the patience of a saint and I couldn't be any happier with the beautiful images she captured. My son felt more than comfortable with Jane as she made it fun for him and made him feel totally at ease, he really enjoyed the session. The photos are absolutely amazing, so natural and show my sons personality perfectly. I will definitely be booking again in the future." Thank you x

 

 

I think the way the mother/photographer from the article, got around the problem with her child was creative. Obviously so much fun for her children too.

Is this something you would find fun and beneficial for your child? Would this be something you would consider? 

  

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